Trees in the News

Trees Take Center Stage

October 11, 2011

Benicia Arbor Week includes Tree City ceremony, study of inventory, master plan

By Donna Beth Weilenman, Staff Reporter for the Benicia Herald

In events that begin Tuesday with looks at the city’s tree inventory and its tree master plan, residents and officials alike will celebrate trees during Benicia Arbor Week.

PROCLAMATION IN RECOGNITION OF THE OBSERVANCE OF BENICIA ARBOR DAY ON OCTOBER 15, 2011 AND A TREE CITY USA QUALIFICATION EVENT ON OCTOBER 15, 2011

October 4, 2011

WHEREAS, in 1872, J. Sterling Morton proposed to the

Nebraska Board of Agriculture that a special day be set aside for the

planting of trees; and

WHEREAS, the holiday called Arbor Day was first observed

with the planting of more than a million trees in Nebraska; and

WHEREAS, Arbor Day is now observed at various times of the

year throughout the nation and the world; and

WHEREAS, trees can reduce the erosion of our precious topsoil

due to wind and water, cut heating and cooling costs, moderate

On Benicia’s solar array and city trees

September 27, 2011

NO TREE LOVER likes to see trees cut down. Unfortunately, in many urban environments, trees often become subjects of controversy in contested spaces, both public and private. Trees in cities are often at risk of removal, or damage from the vicissitudes of urban life.

Letter to the Editor: Tree Foundation Weighs in on Tree Removal

September 27, 2011

Dear Editor:

No tree lover likes to see trees cut down. Unfortunately, in many urban environments, trees often become subjects of controversy in contested spaces, both public and private. Trees in cities are often at risk of removal, or damage from the vicissitudes of urban life.

Shade: A weapon against skin cancer, childhood obesity

August 9, 2011

Shade does more than protect children's skin. A growing number of advocates say it also may help kids stay more active.

Trees Eat Pollution Better Than Expected

October 21, 2010

Some common and dangerous air pollutants found in cities can be absorbed by plants at far greater rates than ever suspected.

The discovery has big implications for modeling how vegetation affects pollutants, as well as how particles in the atmosphere affect human health and global warming.

More Trees = Less Crime

May 29, 2011

Chicago's Robert Taylor Homes is the largest public housing development in the world. The Robert Taylor Homes consist of 28 sixteen-story apartment buildings. Most of the complex is an urban desert- concrete and asphalt cover the spaces between the buildings- but there are pockets of trees here and there. In 2001, Frances Kuo and Bill Sullivan of the University of Illinois Human-Environment Research Laboratory studied how well the residents of Robert Taylor were doing in their daily lives based on the amount of contact they had with these trees.

Some City Trees May Discourage 'Shady' Behavior

November 1, 2010

PORTLAND, Ore. November 1, 2010. Along with energy conservation and storm-water reduction, scientists may soon be adding crime-fighting to the list of benefits that urban trees provide. Researchers with the U.S. Forest Service's Pacific Northwest (PNW) and Southern Research Stations have published a new study that suggests that certain types of city trees may help lower property and violent crime rates.

An Unusual Look at Trees and Crime

May 29, 2011

"People have an intuitive sense that trees are good things," Geoffrey Donovan said. "Being a soulless economist, I like to quantify things. 'Trees are nice' isn't a very useful statement. You need to know how nice and in what sorts of circumstances."

Troop 20639 helps replace destroyed tulip trees in Southampton Park

April 27, 2011

By Donna Beth Weilenman, Staff Reporter, Benicia Herald

Last month, vandals chopped through most of the 20 young tulip trees that had been planted at Southampton Park with the help of Interact Club members of Benicia High School last October.

Tuesday afternoon, members of Girl Scout Troop 20639 helped plant the first of a batch of new trees that will replace the ones that were killed.

“I’m already inspired by them,” said Wolfram Alderson, executive director of the Benicia Tree Foundation, which helped organize the event.